The Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society is a refereed theological journal published by the Evangelical Theological Society. It was first published in 1958 as the Bulletin of the Evangelical Theological Society, and was given its present name in 1969.[1][2] It is a "major journal of conservative American theology."[3]

History

The journal has been published continuously since 1958. The first issue of the Bulletin contained a single article, Ned B. Stonehouse's presidential address to the society's annual meeting, entitled "The Infallibility of Scripture and Evangelical Progress."[4] In 1969 the publication attained its present title.[2] In 1988 the circulation was approximately 2500;[5] by 2016 it had increased to 5000.[6] The society provides free online access to digitized back issues.[7] For 22 years until 2021, the editor was Andreas J. Köstenberger; Dorian Coover-Cox succeeded him.[8]

Contents and outlook

The Evangelical Theological Society is composed of Christians who affirm the inerrancy of the Bible.[2] The journal is focused predominantly on biblical studies.[2][5] In its early years, it provided a venue for evangelicals questioning dispensationalism.[9] While at first sympathetic to neo-orthodoxy and the work of Karl Barth, it turned sharply against Barth in the mid-1960s.[2]

Editors

Editors without a direct reference were compiled by referencing the JETS archives.[10]

Year Editor Volumes
1958–1959 Stephen Barabas[11] 1–2
1960–1961 John Luchies[11] 3–4
1962–1975 Samuel J. Schultz 5–18
1976–1999 Ronald Youngblood 19–42
2000–2021 Andreas J. Kostenberger[12] 43–?
2021–present Dorian Coover-Cox[12]

References

  1. ^ "Evangelical Theological Society". Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism. Westminster John Knox Press. 2002. p. 202. ISBN 9780664224097. Retrieved 27 July 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e Swinson, Daniel L. (1986). "Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society". In Lippy, Charles H. (ed.). Religious Periodicals of the United States: Academic and Scholarly Journals. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. pp. 305–309. ISBN 978-0-313-23420-0.
  3. ^ Shults, F. LeRon (2003). Reforming Theological Anthropology: After the Philosophical Turn to Relationality. Eerdmans. p. 204. ISBN 9780802848871.
  4. ^ "The Evangelical Theological Society". JETS main page. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  5. ^ a b Fieg, Eugene C. (1988). "Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society". Religion Journals and Serials: An Analytical Guide. New York: Greenwood Press. pp. 115–116. ISBN 978-0-313-24513-8.
  6. ^ LaGuardia, Cheryl, ed. (2016). Magazines for Libraries. New Providence, NJ. pp. 700–701. ISBN 978-1-60030-663-1.
  7. ^ Smith, Gregory (2008). "Hidden Under a Bushel? Evangelical Journals in an Era of Web-Based Communications". The Christian Librarian. Vol. 51, no. 1. pp. 3–11. ISSN 2572-7478.
  8. ^ "Dr. Coover-Cox Appointed as Editor of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (JETS) - DTS Voice".
  9. ^ Hart, D. G. (2002). That Old-Time Religion in Modern America: Evangelical Protestantism in the Twentieth Century. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee. p. 126. ISBN 978-1-56663-460-1.
  10. ^ "The Evangelical Theological Society". JETS PDF Archives. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  11. ^ a b Samuel J. Schultz, "Editorial", JETS 12.1 (1969), p. 1.
  12. ^ a b "Dr. Coover-Cox Appointed as Editor of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (JETS)". Dallas Theological Seminary. 8 January 2021. Retrieved 28 July 2022.

External links